Resources by Phillip Ort

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Sermon of the Week: No. 1010, "Light for Those Who Sit in Darkness"

Dec 13 Charles Spurgeon lamented that Jesus was a “prophet without honour” in his own country. But, as Spurgeon knew the “loss of Nazareth” proved to be the “gain of Galilee.” When Jesus Christ was rejected by men, he turned his tender gaze towards those likewise rejected who “sat in darkness.” In this Sermon of the Week join us as Spurgeon holds forth the light of Christ to those who sit in...

Sermon of the Week: No. 752, "The King in His Beauty"

Dec 3 Charles Spurgeon loved to gaze upon the “King in his beauty.” While Charles knew that Isaiah 33:17 referred to Hezekiah, he asserted that “We have a nobler King than Hezekiah; he is the King of kings and Lord of lords.” In this Sermon of the Week join us as Spurgeon reflects upon the beauty of Christ's kingship and redemptive work.

Sermon of the Week: No. 668-669, "Unity in Christ"

Nov 26 For Charles Spurgeon, Christ’s prayer for the unity of his people was not only his “most tender and touching prayer,” but it also “[opened] up to us his inmost heart.” In this Sermon of the Week join us as Spurgeon unpacks the beauty and implications of unity in Christ.

Giving Thanks with Charles Haddon Spurgeon

Nov 21 There is much in life for which to be thankful. Family, friends, food, and the changing color of the fall leaves are sweet gifts to be savoured and enjoyed. But, the best gift to be thankful for is Jesus Christ. This Thanksgiving join us in contemplating Christ and let Christ “flood the whole of [our] faculties” with thankfulness.

Sermon of the Week: No. 320, "Contentment"

Nov 19 It is difficult to be content. Indeed, Charles Spurgeon knew this well, which is why he considered contentment to be “not the least among [Paul’s] manifold acquisitions.” For Spurgeon, it was essential that we "be willing to go downwards, in order that Christ's name may ascend upwards." In this Sermon of the Week join us as Spurgeon plumbs the depths of Christian contentment so that Christ may be "glorified among...

Sermon of the Week: No. 612, "Jesus Washing His Disciples' Feet"

Nov 12 Charles Haddon Spurgeon was amazed by the steadfast love of Christ. The same Christ who was girded "with the towel" would soon be "girt with the bands of death" in order to make propitaiton for his people. Spurgeon knew that "Christ's way of rising was going down" and that his abject humiliation would soon lead to unparalleled glorification. In this Sermon of the Week join us as Spurgeon plumbs the...

Sermon of the Week: No. 800, "The Centurion's Faith and Humility"

Nov 5 For Charles Spurgeon, the radical faith of Luke’s Roman centurion reminded him that “The greatest light may enter into the darkest places.” When it came to radical faith Spurgeon knew that often “the best pearls have been found in the darkest caves of ocean." Indeed, niether social or economic class could limit the strength of faith or personal virtue. In this Sermon of the Week join us as Spurgeon expounds upon...

Sermon of the Week: No. 445-446, "Resurrection - Christ the Firstfruits"

Oct 29 For Charles Spurgeon the historical reality of the resurrection was unassailable and essential. Not only was the resurrection "exceedingly well attested," it is also the "very basis of our holy faith." For Spurgeon the "silver thread of resurrection runs through all the blessings...and binds them together." In this Sermon of the Week join us as Spurgeon relishes the richness of the resurrection of Christ.

Sermon of the Week: No. 170, "The Immutability of Christ"

Oct 22 For Charles Spurgeon the immutability of Christ provided a wealth of "useful, consoling, and practical lessons." The trials and tribulations of this changing world left his hearers' "hearts full of misery," but the matchless consolation of Christ provided an immoveable, unshakeable foundation for hope. In this Sermon of the Week join us as Spurgeon meditates upon the sweetness of his immutable, unchanging Lord Jesus Christ.

Sermon of the Week: No. 502, "A Jealous God"

Oct 15 The jealousy of God made Charles Spurgeon tremble with awe. God could not endure to see a creature "made to wear his crown," or the idols in the hearts of men. Indeed, for Spurgeon  one of the hardest "struggles" of the Christian life was to learn this lesson: "Not unto us, not unto us, but unto thy name be glory." In this Sermon of the Week join us as Spurgeon seeks...