Spurgeon’s Parting Pastoral Words – Jan. 14, 1892

By / Jul 18

The final weeks of Spurgeon’s life were spent in sunny Menton, in southern France. Throughout his ministry, he had gone there to recover from his various ailments and overwork. Now, in the fall of 1891, Spurgeon was there once again. Under the care of his wife Susie and skilled doctors, the congregation fully expected him to recover and return to London to continue his famous ministry at the Metropolitan Tabernacle. Spurgeon himself held on to this hope. But this was not to be. On January 31, 1892, Spurgeon went to be with the Lord.[1]

Throughout his ministry, Spurgeon wrote many letters to his congregation during his travels. Even when traveling abroad, visiting new places, and preaching before thousands, Spurgeon never forgot his own church. In his letters to them, we see the affection of a pastor for his people, his confidence in his elders and deacons, and his dependence on his people for their prayers. During his final trip to Mentone, Spurgeon committed to writing a weekly letter back to his people, updating them on his situation and encouraging them to persevere. These four letters comprise Spurgeon’s final pastoral words to his people.[2]

Over the next four weeks, we will be publishing Spurgeon’s last letters to his congregation, beginning on December 24 and ending on January 14. While nobody expected these to be his last words to his church, they are a fitting conclusion to his pastoral ministry. In them, we see Spurgeon’s confidence in God’s power to build up the church and save the lost, even apart from his own ministry. We see his call for his people to persevere in the truth of the gospel. And we see his evident love for them. In other words, what characterized Spurgeon’s ministry from the very first day continued to his last breath. May the same be true of pastors today.


Menton. Jan. 14. 1892

My Dear Friends,

I have not seen the doctor since writing last time, & I have therefore little to say about my health so far as medical testimony goes. We have had a week of broken, uncertain weather; days of rain, intervals of wind, & hours of cold. This has kept me very much within doors, for I dare not run the risk of a chill; & therefore I fear I have made no progress, & can hardly hope that I am quite so well, as to my internal mischief. In other respects I feel fairly up to the mark, & deeply grateful to be free from pain, & free from fear as to the ultimate result.

I earnestly hope that your weather will improve. When it is bad here what must it be with you. The snow on the mountains reminds us of what others are enduring. I wish I could be in such health as to be always with you, but as this cannot be I am most thankful for the retreat afforded by this sheltered spot, & even more so for the rest of heart which comes to me through knowing that you are all spiritually fed under the ministry of Dr. Pierson. May his health be maintained & that of his wife during your trying winter.

You may feel sure that I am doing pretty well, or the doctor would be looking me up. When he next calls I will have a bulletin from him; & till then you may rest in peace about me. May the saturating showers of blessing, for which I am looking, soon fall in tropical abundance, & may no part of the field be left dry. If there are any very sad, down-cast, & self-condemned ones among you, I desire my special love to them. The Lord himself looks from heaven to spy out such special characters. See Job 33:27, 28. I think this text is a message for somebody. May grace abound towards you.

Yours ever heartily,

C. H. Spurgeon



[1] For an account of Spurgeon’s last days and his funeral, see From Mentone to Norwood: The Final Journey of C. H. Spurgeon

[2] Spurgeon’s last sermon to his people was preached on June 7, 1891 The Statute of David for the Sharing of the Spoil



Spurgeon’s Parting Pastoral Words – Jan. 6, 1892

By / Jul 11

The final weeks of Spurgeon’s life were spent in sunny Menton, in southern France. Throughout his ministry, he had gone there to recover from his various ailments and overwork. Now, in the fall of 1891, Spurgeon was there once again. Under the care of his wife Susie and skilled doctors, the congregation fully expected him to recover and return to London to continue his famous ministry at the Metropolitan Tabernacle. Spurgeon himself held on to this hope. But this was not to be. On January 31, 1892, Spurgeon went to be with the Lord.[1]

Throughout his ministry, Spurgeon wrote many letters to his congregation during his travels. Even when traveling abroad, visiting new places, and preaching before thousands, Spurgeon never forgot his own church. In his letters to them, we see the affection of a pastor for his people, his confidence in his elders and deacons, and his dependence on his people for their prayers. During his final trip to Mentone, Spurgeon committed to writing a weekly letter back to his people, updating them on his situation and encouraging them to persevere. These four letters comprise Spurgeon’s final pastoral words to his people.[2]

Over the next four weeks, we will be publishing Spurgeon’s last letters to his congregation, beginning on December 24 and ending on January 14. While nobody expected these to be his last words to his church, they are a fitting conclusion to his pastoral ministry. In them, we see Spurgeon’s confidence in God’s power to build up the church and save the lost, even apart from his own ministry. We see his call for his people to persevere in the truth of the gospel. And we see his evident love for them. In other words, what characterized Spurgeon’s ministry from the very first day continued to his last breath. May the same be true of pastors today.


Menton. Jan. 6. 92

My Dear Friends,

There is nothing for me to say in reporting myself to head-quarters beyond this – that I hope & believe that the steady & solid progress which had begun is continued, & will continue. If a doctor were to visit me now for the first time, & were to investigate my disease, he would pronounce it to be a bad case. But those who know what I have been, & how much worse than at present everything was – must wonder at me, & think it a remarkably good case. God be thanked for all that he has done in answer to his people’s prayers. Never let us have a doubts as to the fidelity of ability of the God of the promises & of the mercy-seat.

On looking back upon the Valley of the Shadow of death through which I passed so short a time ago, I feel my mind grasping with firmer grip than ever that everlasting gospel which for so many years I have preached to you. We have not been deceived. Jesus does give rest to those who come to him, he does save those who trust him, he does photograph his image on those who learn of him. I hate the Christianized infidelity of the modern school more than ever, as I see how it rends away from sinful man his last & only hope. Cling to the gospel of forgiveness through the substitutionary sacrifice; & spread it with all your might, each one of you, for it is the only cure for bleeding hearts.

Peace be unto you as a whole; & peace be to each one! I greet with whole-hearted gratitude my brother Dr. Pierson, & with unfeigned love each deacon, elder, & member, & worker. My own dear brother in the flesh is also ever watching over the concern of our great work. May the Lord himself keep watch over all. To Mr. Stott, I wish a long & prosperous ministry where the Lord shall direct him.

Yours ever lovingly,

C. H. Spurgeon



[1] For an account of Spurgeon’s last days and his funeral, see From Mentone to Norwood: The Final Journey of C. H. Spurgeon

[2] Spurgeon’s last sermon to his people was preached on June 7, 1891 The Statute of David for the Sharing of the Spoil



Spurgeon’s Parting Pastoral Words – Dec. 31, 1891

By / Jul 4

The final weeks of Spurgeon’s life were spent in sunny Menton, in southern France. Throughout his ministry, he had gone there to recover from his various ailments and overwork. Now, in the fall of 1891, Spurgeon was there once again. Under the care of his wife Susie and skilled doctors, the congregation fully expected him to recover and return to London to continue his famous ministry at the Metropolitan Tabernacle. Spurgeon himself held on to this hope. But this was not to be. On January 31, 1892, Spurgeon went to be with the Lord.[1]

Throughout his ministry, Spurgeon wrote many letters to his congregation during his travels. Even when traveling abroad, visiting new places, and preaching before thousands, Spurgeon never forgot his own church. In his letters to them, we see the affection of a pastor for his people, his confidence in his elders and deacons, and his dependence on his people for their prayers. During his final trip to Mentone, Spurgeon committed to writing a weekly letter back to his people, updating them on his situation and encouraging them to persevere. These letters comprise Spurgeon’s final pastoral words to his people.[2]

Over the next four weeks, we will be publishing Spurgeon’s last letters to his congregation, beginning on December 24 and ending on January 14. While nobody expected these to be his last words to his church, they are a fitting conclusion to his pastoral ministry. In them, we see Spurgeon’s confidence in God’s power to build up the church and save the lost, even apart from his own ministry. We see his call for his people to persevere in the truth of the gospel. And we see his evident love for them. In other words, what characterized Spurgeon’s ministry from the very first day continued to his last breath. May the same be true of pastors today.


Menton Dec. 31. 91

My Dear Friends,

I am sorry my letter of last week reached London too late for reading on Sunday, but this was occasioned by delays in the trains, & not by any omission on my part. It is kind on the part of so many newspapers to publish it, for thus I trust most of you have read it.

I believe I am right in reporting a greater change in the disease than could be spoken of before. It is still a great drain upon me; but as it has improved so far, I believe it will make more rapid diminution. What a joy it will be to be within measurable distance of the time to return to my pulpit & to you. I have not reached that point yet.

Now may the Lord cause the cloud of blessing to burst upon you in a great tropical shower. I am expecting this. Grateful beyond expression for all that the Lord has done & is doing, I am eager for more. Indulgence in covetousness is sinful, but not when we “covet earnestly the best gifts.” All that I can do is to pray & expect. I am sometimes fearful lest anything in me should hinder the blessing; do you not each one feel the same fear on your own account? Before some sweet music is about to be heard, there is a hush. Each one is afraid to breathe lest the tone should be spoiled & the music marred. I fell just so at this moment. May no whisper that would grieve the Holy Spirit be heard in house or heart. Let all coldness, worldliness, difference, or selfishness be put forth as the old leaven, that we may keep the feast of New Year without anything that defileth.

The Lord himself deal out to each one of his children a full portion, & to those who linger at the gate, may the Good Spirit give his gracious drawings that they may cross the sacred threshold this day. Peace be within the gates of our dear sanctuary, & prosperity within her doors. For my brethren & companions sake will I now say, “Peace be within thee.”

Yours to serve when I can & to love unceasingly,

C. H. Spurgeon



[1] For an account of Spurgeon’s last days and his funeral, see From Mentone to Norwood: The Final Journey of C. H. Spurgeon

[2] Spurgeon’s last sermon to his people was preached on June 7, 1891 The Statute of David for the Sharing of the Spoil



Spurgeon’s Parting Pastoral Words – Dec. 24, 1891

By / Jun 27

The final weeks of Spurgeon’s life were spent in sunny Menton, in southern France. Throughout his ministry, he had gone there to recover from his various ailments and overwork. Now, in the fall of 1891, Spurgeon was there once again. Under the care of his wife Susie and skilled doctors, the congregation fully expected him to recover and return to London to continue his famous ministry at the Metropolitan Tabernacle. Spurgeon himself held on to this hope. But this was not to be. On January 31, 1892, Spurgeon went to be with the Lord.[1]

Throughout his ministry, Spurgeon wrote many letters to his congregation during his travels. Even when traveling abroad, visiting new places, and preaching before thousands, Spurgeon never forgot his own church. In his letters to them, we see the affection of a pastor for his people, his confidence in his elders and deacons, and his dependence on his people for their prayers. During his final trip to Mentone, Spurgeon committed to writing a weekly letter back to his people, updating them on his situation and encouraging them to persevere. These letters comprise Spurgeon’s final pastoral words to his people.[2]

Over the next four weeks, we will be publishing Spurgeon’s last letters to his congregation, beginning on December 24 and ending on January 14. While nobody expected these to be his last words to his church, they are a fitting conclusion to his pastoral ministry. In them, we see Spurgeon’s confidence in God’s sovereign grace, even apart from his own ministry. We see Spurgeon’s call for his people to persevere in the truth of the gospel. And we see his evident love for them. In other words, what characterized Spurgeon’s ministry from the very first day continued to his last breath. May the same be true of pastors today.


Menton. Dec. 24. 91.

My Dear Friends,

            For the last time in the year 1891 I write you, & with this brief note, I send hearty gratitude for your loving-kindness to me during the year which is ending & fervent wishes for a special blessing on the year so soon to begin. I have nearly finished thirty-eight years of my ministry among you, & have completed XXXVII volumes of published sermons, preached in your midst. Yet we are not wearied of each other. I shall hail the day when I may again speak with you. Surrounded by ten thousand mercies my time of weakness is rendered restful and happy; but still to be able in health & vigour to pursue the blissful path of useful service, would be my heaven below. To be denied activities which have become part of my nature, seems so strange; but as I cannot alter it, & as I am sure that infinite wisdom rules it, I bow before the divine will, — my Father’s will. Again the Doctor reports favourably, that is to say, yesterday he said that there was decided improvement as to the disease; nothing great, but as much as he could hope for; — nothing speedy could be looked for, but matters were going most encouragingly. I was to be very careful about a chill, etc.

            This is an old & dull story to you. Only your prayerful & persevering interest in me could make me bold enough to repeat it.

            Honestly, I do not think you are losers by my absence, so long as the Lord enables our dear friend Dr. Pierson to preach as he does. There is a cloud of blessing resting on you now. Turn the cloud into a shower by the heavenly electricity of believing prayer. May the Watch-night be a night to be remembered, & on the first hour of the year may the Lord say, “From this day will I bless you.”

Yours with faithful love,

C. H. Spurgeon



[1] For an account of Spurgeon’s last days and his funeral, see From Mentone to Norwood: The Final Journey of C. H. Spurgeon

[2] Spurgeon’s last sermon to his people was preached on June 7, 1891 The Statute of David for the Sharing of the Spoil



Highlights from The Sword & the Trowel 1880-1884

By / Sep 28

In 1884, as The Sword & the Trowel finished 20 years of publication and Spurgeon turned 50, the ministry at the Metropolitan Tabernacle was in full swing. The Pastors’ College was a regular feature of the magazine, as graduates reported back on the progress of their work. Reports from Stockwell Orphanage encouraged the readers as they supported that ministry to orphans. Conversion stories from the Colporteurs and other evangelists also encouraged readers in their own evangelistic efforts and prayers for the lost. Other charitable ministries, like Mrs. Spurgeon’s Book Fund, were also regularly featured. And Spurgeon’s sermons, as always, provided an ongoing source of spiritual encouragement.

Yet all was not well. As always, these ministries faced their ups and downs. College graduates sometimes experienced disappointment and little fruit. Missionaries returned from the field sick and discouraged. Finances for the orphanage and college were often tight. And Spurgeon continued to struggle with poor health. Beyond these challenges, there loomed a dark cloud over the horizon. Writing in 1883, Spurgeon observed,

The enemy is gathering strength, and mustering his bold forces for fiercer attacks. What doctrine is now left unassailed? What holy thing is regarded as sacred? Truths once regarded as fundamental, are either denied, or else turned inside out till nothing of their essence remains. Holy Scripture is no longer admitted to be the infallible record of revelation, but is made to be a doormat for “thought” to wipe its shoes upon. Every sign of the times warns us of a desperate conflict for all that is precious and vital in our religion.

Here in these issues of The Sword and the Trowel, we see an active, fruitful church, but we should not imagine it to be a well-oiled machine running smoothly without a hitch. Rather, Spurgeon knew that all these enterprises depended on the prayers and support of God’s people. Ultimately, they depended on God’s grace for fruit. Together, they worked to build up the church and fight against evil.

Here are just a few highlights from these five years. As you read through these issues, send us a note on Twitter (@SpurgeonMBTS) if you find anything interesting!

(To jump straight to the article, click on the link, then click the “View this Resource” button.)

1880

Praise of Men – The fear of man is a snare, especially in the ministry. Beware!

A man who becomes dependent upon the opinions of others lays himself open to contempt. It is impossible to think highly of a person who fishes for compliments. To value esteem so much as to go out of our way after it is the surest possible way to lose it. When we consider how unevenly the human hand holds the balances, we may feel but small concern when we are weighed by our fellow-men. If we consider how infinitely precious is the divine regard, we shall live to gain it, and so shall rise above all slavish consideration of the opinions of our fellows.

Against Hastening to Remove From Our Post of Duty – Are you tempted to leave your ministry position? Consider Spurgeon’s encouragement to persevere.

Has the minister just entered upon a fresh sphere, and does he miss the affectionate warmth of his old acquaintances? Does he find his new people strange and singular? Do they appear cold and distant? Let him persevere, and all this will wear off, and he will come to love the very people to whom he now feels an aversion, and find his best helpers among those who now seem to be utterly indifferent to him. The call of Providence has brought him where he is, and he must not venture to leave because of inconveniences; often it will be his wisdom to regard these as a part of the tokens that he is in the right way, for the appointed path is seldom easy to the feet.

1881

Young Preachers Encouraged – For those starting out in their preaching, here is some encouragement from Spurgeon. For those who are further along in your preaching, how can you raise up more preachers?

I am not old enough to have forgotten the struggles of my own early days, or the influence of a cheering word upon my young heart, and so I take a loving and lively interest in those who sincerely endeavor to do their best for their Master, even though that best be raw and uncouth. “Would God that all the Lord’s servants were prophets,” and that far greater numbers of laborers were sent into the harvest of the great Householder.

C. H. S. on “Taking the Bull by the Horns” – A parable for pastors who are prone to confrontation and conflict in the church.

THERE was a little trouble in the church, and the young minister was sad about it. He sought advice, and one who loved peace begged him to let the matter alone, and in a short time the evil would die of itself, for, as Solomon says, “Where no wood is the fire goeth out.” The brother was of a fretful spirit, and could not take things quite so easily; it worried him that there should be a single weed in his garden, and he felt he would sooner plough it all up than let that weed remain.

1882

Two Prayer-Meetings at the Tabernacle & Two more Tabernacle Prayer-Meetings – The prayer-meetings at the Tabernacle were the engine of the ministry of the church. Here are accounts of two recent meetings at the Tabernacle, offered as a suggestion for pastors to consider as they planned their own prayer meetings.

IT has been thought that an account of Tabernacle Prayer-meetings might be useful to those who conduct these holy gatherings elsewhere. It will exhibit the great variety of which such meetings are capable, and may suggest to friends who complain of dull prayer-meetings methods for curing such a grievous ill. We do not set up our prayer-meetings as models, but merely as suggestions. We give only two meetings, but we hope to continue the account next month.

1883

How to Attract a Congregation – Spurgeon rejected the seeker-sensitive strategies of his day and proposed an alternative for his students to follow, namely the preaching of the gospel.

Among the absurd articles which have appeared lately, I noticed one which gravely asserted that in our colleges young ministers are taught everything but their main business: that main business being the art of attracting a congregation. Is not that a remarkably wise remark? Surely, a Daniel has at last come to judgment. Not taught how to attract a congregation. What a grievous omission! Surely a subscription should be commenced, and a chair founded for this neglected department of practical theology. Who shall occupy the aforesaid chair? Let us hope it will be a good arm-chair, well made, and daintily stuffed for the benefit of the professor who is to sit in it; but what will he do in return for his endowment? What text-book will he use? Into what divisions will he apportion his scientific observations? I am lost in conjecture. Assuredly, I am not a candidate for the proposed office.

1884

In my Fiftieth Year and Getting Old – When Spurgeon began his pastorate in London at the age of 19, his request to his congregation was that they would pray for him in his youthfulness. Now at the age of 50, Spurgeon reflects on the temptations and challenges of old age and once again asks his church to pray for him.

When all is said and done, the jubilation of our Jubilee does not call for any great blowing of trumpets, but rather for uplifting of hand and heart in prayer to God for further help. It may be that we are only in mid-voyage. May that voyage end in landing our freight in port, and not as some life-passages have terminated, namely, in an utter wreck of every hope! Our friends and fellow-helpers will, we trust, supplicate on our behalf that we may receive a fresh anointing from on high, and we will begin life again without fear.



“Dumb Dogs” in the Pulpit: Spurgeon on Borrowed Sermons

By / Jul 5

Iain Murray once observed that Spurgeon wrote and preached so much that people can basically cherry-pick quotes from his works to support virtually any position, even those he would’ve adamantly opposed. Such has been the case with the topic of plagiarizing sermons recently. Every few years, this controversy resurfaces. Some are quick to condemn it, while others attempt to provide a more nuanced response. Sometimes, the latter will point to examples in church history of those who plagiarized sermons, and among those listed is Spurgeon. Did Spurgeon support preaching borrowed sermons?

Spurgeon repudiated plagiarism in the pulpit

Spurgeon was a remarkably original preacher. While ministers in the Church of England still read sermons from the book of homilies, Spurgeon believed that the preacher should depend not on pre-written sermons but the Holy Spirit. This dependence took place not only while preaching but even in sermon preparation. At the heart of Spurgeon’s rejection of plagiarism was his deep conviction that preaching should be led by the Spirit.

Amid a full ministry schedule during the week, Spurgeon carved out time late into the night on Saturdays to work on his sermons. In his lectures to his students, we see that prayerful dependence was at the heart of his preparations.

To me still, I must confess, my text selection is a very great embarrassment— embarras de richesses, as the French say—an embarrassment of riches, very different from the bewilderment of poverty—the anxiety of attending to the most pressing of so many truths, all clamoring for a hearing, so many duties all needing enforcing, and so many spiritual needs of the people all demanding supply. I confess that I frequently sit hour after hour praying and waiting for a subject, and that this is the main part of my study. (Lectures 1:88)

Spurgeon would spend much of the night studying the Scriptures, trying out different “skeletons” (sermon outlines), and praying for the Spirit to guide him in preparing the sermon. During his study, Spurgeon consulted commentaries and other writers, but never as a substitute for the Spirit’s leading. In the end, he looked for spiritual guidance. “Many ministers appear to think that they are to choose the text; they are to discover its teaching; they are to find a discourse in it. We do not think so.”

How different was Spurgeon’s approach from those who simply borrowed another’s sermon!  Spurgeon often rebuked preachers of his day for reading other’s sermons as their own, rather than prayerfully preparing one for their people. To do so was to forego the Spirit’s work in the preacher. Spurgeon clearly repudiated such a practice, and he spoke about it clearly.[1]

Spurgeon believed that those who preached borrowed sermons did so for their own ease and convenience.

There are still plenty who hardly know anything about the gospel. They preach about a great many things, but little or nothing about Jesus Christ. They buy their sermons cheaply, and preach them at their ease; they ask God to teach them what to say, and then pull their manuscripts out of their pockets! We have had to mourn, especially in years gone by, that we could look from parish to parish, and find only “dumb dogs” in the pulpits. And some men, who might have spoken with a little earnestness, if they had liked, let the people slumber under them, instead of preaching the Word with true fidelity, remembering that they will have to give account to God at the last. (MTP 45; Sermon No. 2625)

It is no use for a man simply to have a curacy or something of that sort, buy his manuscripts cheap, come up and read off two sermons twenty minutes long, go home with a good conscience that he has done duty twice, and then say, “Let the whole earth be filled with his glory.” … But you shut yourself up in your study, or what is ten times worse, you do nothing at all, but just take it easy all the week till the Sunday comes, and then borrow a sermon out of an old magazine, or buy one of the helps for ministers, or take down one of Charles Simeon’s skeletons and preach it. My good man, you cannot pray in that fashion. (NPSP 3: Sermon No. 129)

Such preachers asked God for help in their preaching, but their use of bought sermons contradicted their prayers. Their concern was more for their convenience rather than the glory of God, and as a result, the sermons they preached were usually poor and lacking Christ.

Preaching borrowed sermons robs the congregation of a minister who has known the truth of God’s Word firsthand.

In order that you may impress the Word upon those to whom you preach, remember that it must be impressed upon yourself first. You must feel it yourself, and speak as a man who feels it, not as if you feel it, but because you feel it, otherwise you will not make it felt by others. I wonder what it must be to go up into the pulpit, and read somebody else’s sermon to the congregation. We read in the Bible of one thing that was borrowed, and the head of that came off; and I am afraid that the same thing often happens with borrowed sermons – the heads come off. Men who read borrowed sermons positively do not know anything about our troubles of mind in preparing for the pulpit, or our joy in preaching with the aid of only brief notes. (Soul Winner, 92)

Borrowed sermons — pages of other people’s experience — fragments pulled from old or new divines — nothing of their own, nothing that God ever said to them, nothing that ever thrilled their hearts or swayed their souls, — God will not own such teaching as this. (MTP 42; Sermon No. 2460).

A borrowed sermon may have someone else’s experience.  But it doesn’t have the preacher’s experience. Those truths have not been impressed on the preacher. He can only preach “as if” he feels it, not “because” he feels it. As a result, the congregation suffers, and “God will not own such teaching as this.”

God will call preachers to account for preaching Christ-less, borrowed sermons.

Oh the curse on the other hand, that shall rest on a man who, in his last moments, shall have to reflect – “I preached other men’s sermons, and talked of anything but Christ; I lifted up anything but the Lord!” (MTP 8:461)

For such preachers, it won’t matter that these sermons were not their sermons. “They will have to give account to God at the last” for their laziness and for every word of these borrowed sermons.

As one who preached at least four times a week, Spurgeon could easily have lightened his load by preaching borrowed sermons. Even more, as one who often preached away, he could’ve lightened his load by taking old sermons and re-preaching them (though this would’ve likely been detected, given how popular his printed sermons were!). But whether in his own pulpit or away, Spurgeon did not want to rob himself of an opportunity for prayerful dependence on the Spirit. Similarly, Spurgeon encouraged the preachers of his day to repudiate plagiarism and to preach their own sermons.

Spurgeon commended the proper use of printed sermons

Having said all that, Spurgeon lived during the age of printed sermons, and he himself published and sold hundreds of thousands of sermons. Certainly, he believed that there were exceptions where a preacher may read a printed sermon in the pulpit appropriately. People have cited these instances as Spurgeon’s support for plagiarizing sermons, but in fact, these would only be exceptions to the rule.

One exception of this is for those who are just starting in their preaching. Early in his preaching career, when he was seventeen, Spurgeon discovered how instructive it was for him to borrow sermon outlines from preachers like John Gill, Charles Simeon, and others. Spurgeon drew heavily from these sources to fill out his preaching outline, but in the end, given that his outline was only a few pages long, he likely still had to fill out his sermon with much of his own extemporaneous insights and comments. As a young teenager learning to preach, these pre-written sermon outlines provided a helpful starting point. By the time he began pastoring in London, he had preached nearly 700 sermons, and though he was still only nineteen, he no longer needed to rely on Gill and others as he did in his early years.

This would be a practice that he later supported also. In 1877, he visited Bristol College and donated a set of his sermons to the college. One person records the event,

He thought the books he gave would be useful to students, as most of them were sermons; “and if any brother would like to preach them (continued Mr. Spurgeon) I hereby decree he shall not be guilty of plagiarism, as I hand them over to be the property of the college.” (Speeches at Home and Abroad, “Earnest Students”)

Note that Spurgeon here makes an exception. Typically, a preacher preaching another’s sermon would be “guilty of plagiarism.” But in this case, because these are students who are learning to preach, he was happy to grant an exception. Eventually, however, Spurgeon insisted that his own students learn to prepare and preach their own sermons. During their studies at the Pastors’ College, students had to prepare and deliver at least one original sermon for critique. On one occasion, a student attempted to plagiarize his sermon.

It has long been our rule that each brother should read in the College at least one discourse which he has himself composed, and which his comrades are expected to criticize. Any attempt at plagiarism would, therefore, be manifestly unfair; and, if detected, would meet with well-merited condemnation. One man, when it came to his turn, was actually reckless and foolish enough to take one of my printed sermons, — I suppose condensed, — and to read it as though it had been his own composition; and he had to thank his brethren that he was not instantly expelled from the Institution, Several of them at once recognized the discourse; and, as soon as the time for criticism arrived, proceeded to pull it to pieces most mercilessly.

They found fault with the introduction, the divisions, the subdivisions, the illustrations, the application, — with everything, in fact, except the doctrine; — I think that was all right! I was so pleased with the critical acumen displayed that I forgave the offender; but I let it be distinctly understood that, for the future, any student repeating the offense, whether with my sermon or anyone else’s, would be forthwith dismissed in disgrace. (Autobiography 3:148)

Spurgeon dealt graciously with this student but also made it clear that such future action would result in expulsion “in disgrace.”

Another story has been raised concerning Spurgeon’s students and plagiarism. Lloyd Jones tells the story of another student who was caught plagiarizing a sermon, which was thought to belong to Spurgeon. As it turns out, it belonged to William Jay of Bath, but the headings and content matched Spurgeon’s!

“’Wait a minute,’ said Spurgeon, and turning to his library, he pulled out one of the volumes and there was the sermon, the exact sermon-the same text, the same headings, the same everything! What had happened? The fact was that Mr. Spurgeon had also preached William Jay’s sermon and had actually put it into print with other sermons of his. Mr. Spurgeon’s only explanation was that it was many years since he had read the two volumes of Jay’s sermons and that he had forgotten all about it. He could say quite honestly that he was not aware of the fact that when he had preached that sermon he was preaching one the sermons of William Jay. It had registered unconsciously in his memory. The student was absolved of the charge of preaching one of Mr. Spurgeon’s sermons, but was still guilty of theft!” (Preaching & Preachers, 294)

I haven’t been able to track down the source of this anecdote, so it’s not clear how accurate it is. Even so, it’s worth observing that Spurgeon firmly opposes plagiarism even in this story. First, the student who consciously used Jay’s sermon was still “guilty of theft.” Second, Spurgeon did not consciously plagiarize Jay, which is why he tried to explain it. Somehow, through his own sermon preparation, Spurgeon had arrived at the same sermon outline as Jay, and in his delivery, he extemporaneously delivered much of the same content. All this happened, remarkably, from being unconsciously influenced by reading Jay’s sermon many years ago. This raises the related but separate issue of unconscious plagiarism… if you have a photographic memory like Spurgeon, watch out! Had he known, Spurgeon would not have done it. But as it is, he unintentionally erred. In the end, it’s clear that Spurgeon did not intend to copy Jay and would still charge sermon plagiarism as theft.

The other exception that Spurgeon might have allowed was on occasions where an inexperienced deacon or layperson read a printed sermon at a Christian gathering because a preacher is unavailable. The stories abound of sailors reading Spurgeon sermons on the high seas or miners gathering in Colorado on a Sunday to hear a Spurgeon sermon. Many were converted on such occasions, and Spurgeon was always glad to hear these stories. Even in such cases, however, the preacher or reader should have made it clear that this was a printed sermon, rather than original to the preacher (which would’ve been obvious in the case of miners and sailors). But on one occasion, he was willing to excuse a lay preacher who clearly passed off one of Spurgeon’s sermons as his own.

I remember once feeling many questions as to whether I was a child of God or not. I went into a little chapel, and I heard a good man preach. He was a simple workingman. I heard him preach, and I made my handkerchief sodden with my tears as I heard him talk about Christ, and the precious blood. When I was preaching the same things to others I was wondering whether this truth was mine, but while I was hearing for myself I knew it was mine, for my very soul lived upon it. I went to that good man, and thanked him for the sermon. He asked me who I was. When I told him, he turned all manner of colors. “Why,” he said, “Sir, that was your own sermon.” I said, “Yes, I knew it was, and it was good of the Lord to feed me with food that I had prepared for others.” (MTP 32, Sermon No. 1877)

Spurgeon loved Jesus. And he understood that God could use even a borrowed sermon to glorify His Son. Such was the case in the story above. The “simple workingman” had plagiarized his sermon (and was clearly embarrassed by it). Spurgeon did not commend the practice but humbly thanked him for the sermon and praised God for using it for his encouragement.

But Spurgeon was no pragmatist. Though God could work through a plagiarizing preacher, He did so despite the preacher’s dishonesty and laziness. For himself, he sought to maintain a prayerful dependence on God by only preaching his own sermons, and he urged his students and other pastors to do the same.


[1] Many thanks to Phil Johnson, a friend of the Spurgeon Library, for compiling these and many other quotes.