Blog Entry

Sermon of the Week: No. 1, "The Immutability of God"

By Phillip Ort Jan 23, 2019

“The most excellent study for expanding the soul, is the science of Christ, him crucified, and the knowledge of the Godhead in the glorious trinity.”

 

For Charles Spurgeon, God, in his Triune and immutable nature, was matchless in beauty. In his view the knowledge of God was the “highest science,” the “loftiest speculation,” and the “mightiest philosophy.”

 

Indeed, Spurgeon believed that there was “something exceedingly improving to the mind in a contemplation of the Divinity.” This subject was so vast that “all our thoughts are lost in its immensity” and so deep that “our pride is drowned in its infinity.” The “plumb-line” of man’s thinking could not “sound the depth” of God.

 

Accordingly, the knowledge of God’s infinite immensity produced humility in his finite creatures. But, Spurgeon also noted that “while the subject humbles the mind it also expands it.” Indeed, Spurgeon asserted that nothing “will so enlarge the intellect,” or “magnify the whole soul of man, as a devout, earnest continued investigation of the Deity.”

 

But, while the subject of God was “humbling” and “expanding” Spurgeon believed it to be “eminently consolatory.” Indeed, in “contemplating Christ” Spurgeon found a “balm for every wound.” In “musing on the Father” he found a “quietus for every grief, and in the “influence of the Holy Ghost” he found “a balsam for every sore.” If the believer wanted to “lose your sorrows” or “drown your cares” they were invited to “plunge yourself in the Godhead’s deepest sea.” Indeed, those willing to be “lost in the immensity of God” would find themselves “refreshed and invigorated” as only God could “calm the swelling billows of grief and sorrow.”

 

In the first section of his sermon Spurgeon focused on “The Immutability of God.” Here he sought to “expound” the thought before “[bringing] a few arguments to prove its truth.”

 

First, Spurgeon declared that “God is Jehovah and he changes not in his essence.” While Spurgeon admitted “we do not know what substance that is which we call God” Spurgeon knew that God was a being and that “his essence never changes.” Whereas “all creatures change,” and “man, especially as to his body” is always changing, “God is perpetually the same.”

 

Second, Spurgeon asserted that “[God] changes not in his attributes.” Here Spurgeon drew attention to God’s great “power” and “wisdom” in providentially governing his world. Indeed, the same God who parted the Red Sea, ransomed his people from Egypt, and saved them from their sin has not diminished in the least degree. Accordingly this provided assurance that God would never change in his “justice,” “truth,” “goodness, and “love.”

 

Third, Spurgeon noted that “God changes not in his plans.” In short, “God is a master-mind,” and has “arranged everything in his gigantic intellect long before he did it.” Indeed, once he made his plan it was done, no revisions necessary.

 

Fourth, Spurgeon rejoiced that “God is unchanging in his promises.” Here Spurgeon exclaimed “Ah! we love to speak about the sweet promises of God.” However, he also declared “if we could ever suppose that one of them could be changed, we would not talk anything more about them.” For Spurgeon, the unchanging nature of God and his promises was the foundation for the life of faith.

 

Fifth, Spurgeon warned that “to some of you God is unchanging in his threatenings.” The same unchanging God who promised redemption and delivered his people was also unchanging in his righteousness and holiness. Indeed, while believers where hidden in the cleft rock of Christ, those apart from Christ were left to tremble at the foot of Sinai.

 

Sixth, and finally, Spurgeon celebrated that “God is unchanging in the objects of his love.” For Spurgeon this aspect was especially important. Indeed, he said, “if one dear saint of God had perished, so might all.” In Spurgeon’s view, if that were to happen then “there is no gospel promise true.” But, wonder of wonders, “the objects of everlasting love never change.” Indeed, God would never forsake or abandon his people.

 

Why you should take up and read:

 

For Charles Spurgeon, God, in his Triune and immutable nature, was matchless in beauty. Indeed, Spurgeon rightly believed that “The most excellent study for expanding the soul, is the science of Christ, him crucified, and the knowledge of the Godhead in the glorious trinity.” For those wanting to know God, to “plunge yourselves in the Godhead’s deepest sea,” please be encouraged to take up and read.

 

Here is the link to the Sermon of the Week:https://www.spurgeon.org/resource-library/sermons/the-immutability-of-god#flipbook/


Phillip Ort serves at the Director of The Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City where he is also pursuing a Master of Divinity degree.